Parents bring children to polls to encourage new generation of voters

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Dora Currea, who ran for the Board of Education for Ward 3, was excited to meet children at the polls. Photo courtesy of Meghan Sorensen.
Dora Currea, who ran for the Board of Education for Ward 3, was excited to meet children at the polls. Photo courtesy of Meghan Sorensen.

By: Meghan Sorensen

Many voters brought their families to the polls for D.C.’s general election. As American politics heat up, parents wish to include their children in the political process, raising more informed voters. Children eagerly entered the polling stations with grins on their faces before plastering their cheeks with “I voted” stickers. 

The Taggarts were one family out of the many that came out on Tuesday to vote at the Wesley Methodist Church. Theron, Alston, and their eleven-year-old twin daughters came to the polls eager to participate in the democratic process.

The girls said they want to vote “because everything makes a difference, and it’s important to vote because it’s important to share your opinion.” They also gleefully agreed they would vote as soon as they were able to. 

The Taggart Family embracing each other at the Wesley Methodist Church. Photo courtesy of Meghan Sorensen.

Theron Taggart shared his own personal belief about the importance of voting and bringing his girls to see how it’s done. “Notwithstanding the fact that we don’t have any congressional representation, one, it’s one of the few things we have that can make a difference year in and year out,” he explained.

“Two, it’s important to teach these girls about citizenship, and it’s one of these priviledges we’re so lucky to have in this country. And we want them to learn all about it,” said Taggart.

Many parents also brought their children to meet with candidates who were encouraged to ask questions and learn about American politics in a more hands-on fashion. Actors John Stamos and Jessica Alba also chose to bring their children along when they voted.

A Northwest D.C. resident who goes by SM said, “I brought my daughter because politics are important. And I want to teach her how to vote so that she can become interested in politics,” he explained. 

“Good politicians can do something for the people, and I want her to realize that. She’s seven years old now. But when she’s bigger she can think about how she went with her dad to see how to vote.” Seven-year-old Zaihan said she would vote as soon as she was old enough.