Fall 2017 Real Estate Calendar: Upcoming events about architecture, homebuying and more

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Monday, Oct. 2: Deane Madsen, founder of the BrutalistDC blog, will discuss “Brutalist Architecture in Washington, D.C.” She will highlight notable and contentious buildings amid the rise of Brutalist architecture in the District. Noon. Free. George Washington University Museum and Textile Museum, 701 21st St. NW. 202-994-5200.

Monday, Oct. 9: Fabian Jud, a doctoral candidate at the University of Zurich, will discuss “The National Mall as an American Memory Space, 1900-1950.” Noon. Free. George Washington University Museum and Textile Museum, 701 21st St. NW. 202-994-5200.

Ben’s Chili Bowl is located at 1213 U St. NW. (Brian Kapur/The Current/August 2017)

Tuesday, Oct. 10: Derek Hyra, associate professor in the Department of Public Administration and Policy at American University, will discuss his book “Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City,” about Northwest’s Shaw/U Street neighborhood as a changing urban community where the causes and effects of gentrification are complex. 6:30 p.m. Free. Juanita E. Thornton/Shepherd Park Library, 7420 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-541-6100.

Wednesday, Oct. 11: Leslie Buhler, former executive director of the Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, will discuss “Tudor Place: America’s Story Lives Here,” about the historic William Thornton-designed house and the six generations of the Peter family who lived and worked there. In her book talk, Buhler will delve into the research, photography and labor that went into creating the Georgetown estate’s first “biography.” 6 to 8 p.m. $15 donation suggested. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, 1644 31st St. NW. tudorplace.org.

Saturday, Oct. 14: The Big Build — a hands-on family festival of tools, trucks and construction — will offer opportunities to explore the inner workings of elevators, create a whimsical wind chime and learn how drones are used in the construction industry. As part of the event, plumbers, ironworkers, landscape architects, woodworkers and experts in many other fields will be on hand to discuss their professions and hobbies. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Free. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448.

Saturday, Oct. 14: University Legal Services will present a First-Time Homebuyer’s Credit Seminar (in English and Spanish). Noon. Free. Mount Pleasant Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202-671-3122.

Saturday, Oct. 14: Colin Dickey, an associate professor of creative writing at National University, will discuss his book “Ghostland: An American History in Haunted Places.” Dickey — who grow up in California a few miles from the Winchester Mystery House, said to be the most haunted house in America — traveled the country in search of ghosts crammed into old houses and hotels and abandoned prisons and hospitals. 8 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919.

Tuesday, Oct. 17: Realtor Ebony Bates will host a real estate information session. 6 p.m. Free. Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1488.

Tuesday, Oct. 17: Herb Auerbach, real estate development consultant, and Ira Nadel, professor of English at the University of British Columbia, will discuss their new book “Placemakers: Emperors, Kings, and Entrepreneurs — A Brief History of Real Estate Development.” The co-authors will explore what has motivated real estate developers throughout the ages, beyond ambition, money and ego. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $10 to $20; reservations required. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448.

Thursday, Oct. 19: Author Denise Kiernan will discuss her book “The Last Castle,” about the largest, grandest residence ever built in the United States — the Biltmore, a Gilded Age mansion on an 8,000-acre estate in North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains whose story spans world wars, the Jazz Age and generations of the famous Vanderbilt family. 6:30 p.m. Free. Kramerbooks & Afterwords, 1517 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-387-1400.

The Franklin School is located at 13th and K streets NW. (Susann Shin/The Current/February 2017)

Monday, Oct. 23: Jacqueline Drayer, community outreach and grants manager for the DC Preservation League, will discuss “Adapting Washington’s Historic Buildings,” with particular attention to case studies of Dorsch’s White Cross Bakery, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Franklin School. Noon. Free. George Washington University Museum and Textile Museum, 701 21st St. NW. 202-994-5200.

Wednesday, Nov. 1: The National Building Museum will screen the first documentary about the work of pioneering landscape architect Beatrix Farrand, designer of Dumbarton Oaks and the only woman among the 11 founding members of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Filmmaker Karyl Evans will join landscape architects Darwina L. Neal and Maureen Joseph to discuss Farrand, her work and her legacy. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $12 to $20; reservations required. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448.